New...'Powers of Ten' Pillows

The last couple of months have been busy making goods based upon the patterns in my Powers of Ten series.   These are 19" x 19" feather-fill pillows created from my surface design collections Crystals, Flotsam, Lilypads, Branches, Pinwhickle and Ropes.  Each design is digitally printed on a linen/cotton blend fabric, with a linen/cotton backing fabric and piping.  All have a zipper closure.

I'll be selling them this weekend at the Horseshoe Holiday Market here in Denver.  It's from 10am to 4pm Satruday at Pavilions.  It would be great to see you there!  I'll also have them for sale on my site soon.  Stay tuned.

Happy Holidays!

Pillows_PLB_Stacked.jpg
Pillows_PLB_GroupDetail.jpg

Archival 8" x 10" Prints are Now Available

I'm now selling 8" x 10" archival prints of my art.  There are 5 different images from my Masks series, 5 from my Objects in Place series and 5 from my Ropes series.  They are $25 each and can be purchased directly from the shop on my website.    They are a standard size and can be framed easily.  I've gotten great feedback from those who have already purchased them.  Thank you!

New Business Cards

While working on repeat pattern design for my Objects in Place series, I was inspired to produce new business cards.  I had them printed through Moo, and I'm thrilled with the result. 

The initial patterns were drawn with templates and rulers and colored in with colored pencils.  I then scanned the images and created seamless repeat line-work using Illustrator.  Here I played around with color, and as you can see there are multiple palettes for many of the patterns.  They are printed on a heavy card stock with a matte finish (the Luxe option at Moo).

Objects in Place - Snacks!!

Thank you all for coming out in support of me and my work.  It means the world to me!  Also, thanks for munching on my edible art:

'Objects in Place' Snacks, Firehouse Arts Center, Longmont CO, marshmallows, hard boiled eggs, salt, wonder bread, goat cheese and cucumber sandwiches, yogurt-covered almonds, mints, paper plates and napkins, patterned paper, 30" x 72" x 9", 2013

Click here to see the series, 'Objects in Place'. 

'Objects in Place' Snacks, Firehouse Art Center, Longmont CO, 30" x 72" x 9", 2013

'Objects in Place' Snacks, Firehouse Art Center, Longmont CO, 30" x 72" x 9", 2013

Teepees and Roofs

After a wonderful week in the Big Horn Mountains of Wyoming I am back to work on my drawings.  While there I was inspired by the teepee frame in the meadow behind the cabin where we stayed and the roofs on the ranger station in the distance.  These two drawings reflect these forms, abstracted and promoted by the patterns and color that emanate from the structures.

Teepee, ink and colored pencil, 5" x 7", 2013

Teepee, ink and colored pencil, 5" x 7", 2013

Roofs, ink and colored pencil, 5" x 7", 2013  

Roofs, ink and colored pencil, 5" x 7", 2013 

Tornado Drawings

Pattie Lee Becker, What I Thought Was Once-Mine is Now Ours, 15" x 22", 2011

Pattie Lee Becker, What I Thought Was Once-Mine is Now Ours, 15" x 22", 2011

In 2011, I was struck by the large quantity of tornadoes that were ripping through the US as far east as Massachusetts. It was unprecedented and being from Kansas, I felt somehow that something of mine was being lost. I knew that I wanted to do a series of sculptures and drawings that investigated tornadoes, and What I Thought Was Once Mine is Now Ours is that exploration. The title responds to my personal sense of perceived loss and also to the emotional and physical collision of the families directly affected by a tornado’s path.  What I Thought Was Once Mine is Now Ours is the first drawing in the series.

As I Slept You Carried Me and We Listened as You Moved On are two new pieces in the tornado series, What I Thought Was Once Mine is Now Ours.  These works are also depictions of my personal relationship to tornadoes.

When I was a young child there was once a tornado whipping through town in the late evening while I slept.  My dad carried me to the basement and with my mom and brother, we all waited there listening to the radio report for the storm to pass.  We were most likely in the basement for a half hour or so, and then we returned to our beds.  These times were exciting.  Rushing to the cellar, listening to the voices on the small radio, hearing the wind outside, heading back upstairs to check the damages and seeing the green black sky recede into the distance.  The next morning when I went to breakfast my older brother was talking about the previous night's experience and I didn't know what he was talking about.  I had slept through the entire storm.  My father had taken me out of bed, carried me downstairs and then back up to bed, and I never awoke.  This non memory has always had a profound effect on me.  As I Slept You Carried Me is a non memory drawing of that storm.

We Listened as You Moved On represents a less specific memory.  There were storms every spring and early summer that made us run back to the house or bike home from the park to be safe in our basement.  These moments were fast, colorful, loud and dreamy.  This drawing investigates that energy, that pull and motion.

See more from the series here.

Eames Molded Plastic Rocker Transformed through Upholstery

As part of the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art's White Space event, sponsored by Design Within Reach, six artists were invited to transform the Eames plastic molded rocker.  I chose to upholster the chair with hand made lacing that I made from some black and white plaid fabric. I loved thinking about the relationship between art and design and hope to work more with furniture. There is something so honest about working with form and function. The other participating artists were: Sabin Aell, Allan Andre, Donald Fodness, Alvin Gregorio and Xi Zhang.

The Process: Templates were made and attached, holes were punched to mark the drill hole locations, holes were drilled and the weaving implemented.

See more here.

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

Pattie Lee Becker transformed Eames chair (process)

The finished piece:

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

Pattie Lee Becker-transformed Eames chair

BMoCA Ropes Exhibition

The exhibition Ropes at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art has been up for a couple of months and has one month to go before it closes.  Please stop by and check it out if you are in the area.  The series is composed of sixteen drawings and two sculptures all of which explore the simplicity and complexities inherent in ropes. Youngna Park at 20x200 wrote a nice piece on their blog: http://www.20x200.com/blog/2010/03/ropes-by-pattie-lee-becker-at-bmoca.html

Thanks to all of you who came out to the opening or otherwise and supported me and my practice.  It means so much to me that all of you have shown up to take a look.  Here are some exhibition images taken by the fantastic friend and photographer Ashley Davis.

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

Pattie Lee Becker's Ropes exhibition at BMoCA 2010

The hanging sculpture is made of woodblock printed linen, batting, tubing, and steel.  Theresa Haberkorn, a local Boulder woodcut printmaker helped me with the carving and printing.  I had never met her before she agreed to come help on the project, and it was really nice working with her.

The Rope Pile (below) is made of handmade ropes that I created from various twines and other materials.  Mathias Leppitsch, a  fabricator, designer, and artist in Denver,  welded me a specific hook that fit into my drill to speed up the otherwise antiquated process.  We spun rope into the wee hours of the morning as the installation date drew near.  A life saver.

There are also two other shows up in the first floor galleries that are very worthwhile: Beverly McIver and Steve Steele.  It’s a privilege to be in their company.